How similar are libraries, museums and archives?

As Glushko writes, the GLAM sector shares many commonalities in terms of both purposes and aims, type of resources collected and ways of organising them (Glushko, 2013). However, I think these similarities are often overstated and you can often look at other organisations and institutions outside of the sector who share these, whilst there is … Continue reading How similar are libraries, museums and archives?

The Taxing Nature of Taxonomies

Both the library world and the academic world is dominated by taxonomies. These systems of classification often rest on defined hierarchies of categories. Carl Linnaeus’ 18th century taxonomy of living things is still a fundamental part of biological science. The Dewey Decimal System and the Library of Congress classification schemes, still dictate how we arrange … Continue reading The Taxing Nature of Taxonomies

The Age of Misc

Traditionally, organising has been seen as a human activity and retrieval as a machine activity (Glushko, 2013). Elaine Svenonius however recognised that automatic text processing and indexing (part of the information retrieval field) had come to either complement or make up for bibliographic description and cataloguing. Svenonius proposed that retrieving information and organising it are … Continue reading The Age of Misc

An Introduction to the Information Behaviour of Arts and Humanities Students and Researchers for new Subject Librarians. An Annotated Bibliography.

This is a piece of work I put together for my MA in Library and Information Services Management course from November 2017. It is an annotated bibliography aimed at subject librarians taking on roles with arts and humanities faculties. It probably focuses more on humanities than arts to be honest.   Al-Shboul, M. K., & … Continue reading An Introduction to the Information Behaviour of Arts and Humanities Students and Researchers for new Subject Librarians. An Annotated Bibliography.